Tom Jacobs

The emergence of data techniques, advanced sensors and vision systems, when combined with production knowledge, allows the condition of machining tools to be more effectively monitored so they can be changed in good time. In our masterclass on tool wear on 3 February, we will look at tool wear in a broad sense from a practical perspective.

Eddy Kunnen

Equipment based on microfluidics is slowly finding its way into everyday life. Just think of the now well-known COVID-19-PCR test. The classic way to manufacture the moulds for these microfluidic systems is by machining (EDM). An alternative with additional advantages is the femto-laser.

Tom Jacobs

The issue of tool wear is not a simple one. What is the importance of controlling and predicting the behaviour of tools? How do you draw the right conclusions from wear images? What data can you use to predict tool condition? Or how do you use direct measurements from camera images in a production environment?

Peter ten Haaf

As a machining company, are you considering investing in a new CAM system? Then you'll certainly want to consider the following points of interest!

Samuel Milton
Tom Jacobs

Cutting parameters used in machining operations are usually selected based on tool manufacturers’ catalogue recommendations or by operator's experience. This is not optimised to the application at hand. At Sirris, we can help you identify tool behaviour and tap the optimal performances in your machining processes with a simple but proven dynamics test.

Peter ten Haaf

Industry 4.0 stands for far-reaching digitisation of production and is a goal for many companies today. Including companies with metalworking activities. However, digitisation, standardisation and automation require first and foremost efficient and controlled machining processes. In a webinar series, we will refresh the basic knowledge and link it to digital evolution. In this webinar, we discuss how to switch from trial-and-error to a structured testing approach.

Peter ten Haaf

Industry 4.0, which stands for the far-reaching digitisation of production, is what many companies are striving for today. Including companies with a metalworking activity. Digitalisation, standardisation, automation ... require first and foremost, efficient and controlled machining processes. Via a webinar series, we refresh the basic knowledge and link it to the digital evolution. The first topic to be discussed will be tool wear.

Peter ten Haaf

Industry 4.0, which stands for the far-reaching digitisation of production, is what many companies are striving for today. Including companies with a metalworking activity. Digitalisation, standardisation, automation, ... require first and foremost, efficient and controlled machining processes. This is what we learn from the existing digital success stories. In a new webinar series, we will therefore first focus on the basics and then make the link to digitalisation.

Tom Jacobs

Sometimes the question arises to what extent cryogenic cooling is environmentally-friendly, as the gases used are a consumable, unlike other refrigerants that can be reused. Cryogenic processing does have interesting environmental advantages. The environmental impact of the entire cryogenic cooling process is many times lower than that of conventional cooling.

Tom Jacobs

Cryogenic cooling during machining stands for machining at very low temperatures. This has advantages both for tools made of heat-resistant materials, where the heat can be high during machining, and for the machining of softer materials, which will flow more easily during machining.