Ceramics are usually the best choice for extreme conditions over a long time span and offer several advantages compared to metals. The main applications of technical ceramics are linked to one or more of these advantages. However, the high hardness of ceramics is also responsible for their main drawbacks. This is why additive manufacturing with ceramics can be challenging. Sirris drew up an e-book on the subject, which you can download for free now.

The rise of additive manufacturing requires digital support for the entire production chain in order to be able to monitor and guarantee product quality. In order to make this possible, Sirris is working on an eID or digital passport for products in its 4.0 Made Real Pilot Factory.

Parts produced by additive manufacturing can be found in an increasing number of sectors where quality criteria are extremely strict, such as the aeronautical field and medicine. For the manufacturers producing these parts, command is essential, not only of their production tool parameters, but also of the quality of the raw materials they comprise. Sirris helps those manufacturers to implement robust quality assurance and control systems.

To produce parts in additive manufacturing (AM) out of metal powders is not a push-and-play technology. Due to the specific thermal history of parts, there are numerous causes of part distortions, even a production crash in the worst cases. Software solutions come in handy here...

Industry 4.0 is the future, that much is clear. However, what this means in practice, is not so clear. Over the past months Sirris has been building its 4.0 Made Real Pilot Factory to materialise the 'Industry 4.0' concept using nine digital building blocks. The time has finally come. We will reveal our 4.0 Made Real infrastructure on 7 November.

Sirris is actively collaborating in the organisation of the 5th Symposium of Additive Manufacturing and the Metal Industries to be held on 17 October 2019 at Charleville-Mezière in France.

Sirris is a stakeholder in the Mecatech Cluster in Wallonia. This cluster groups industrial actors and academics involved in common mechanical engineering projects.

There are several very different ways or technologies to produce parts with additive manufacturing. The ASTM ranges them in seven categories. Because they work differently, specific rules have to be followed if you intend to design a part with one of them. In this second blog, we discuss the different principles.

Can additive manufacturing revolutionise the production of large metallic parts? Combining metal additive manufacturing (AM) techniques with welding techniques is one of the possible options… provided you can produce a quality junction. Discover this year’s WeldALAM project: a Sirris initiative aimed at exploiting welding techniques, in order to meet this challenge.

In this first blog in a series on design in additive manufacturing we discuss the use, advantages and limitations of additive manufacturing and compare the technology to traditional manufacturing techniques.