The EPO treats plants and plant varieties obtained by essentially biological processes (crossing, hybridisation, selective breeding) as non-patentable in principle.

Sirris can 3D print TPU by SLS, creating different hardness zones, either by concentrating on their internal structure or on sintering parameters.

Associating metal sheets or thermoplastic composites with complex 3D printed elements can prove to be of particular interest in certain industrial applications. Sirris has made significant progress in the field thanks to a 6-axis robot with an adapted extrusion head.

The coronavirus pandemic and the possible shortage of medical devices pose a major challenge to the usual production and distribution channels of medical devices. The Federal Agency for Medicines and Health Products (FAMHP) provides adapted guidelines for manufacturers who wish to help in providing more options for care institutions.

Even in these corona times, our employees are at your service, both from home and at our various sites. This means that our labs are operating and we continue to test for you!

To produce parts in additive manufacturing (AM) out of metal powders is not a push-and-play technology. Due to the specific thermal history of parts, there are numerous causes of part distortions, even a production crash in the worst cases. Software solutions come in handy here...

As explained in a previous blogpost, there are many ways to use additive manufacturing. Materials can be used in very different configurations (powder, liquid, sheets, wire, ink,…) and one of the main concerns in AM is removing the materials after the job is completed.

With Selective Laser Sintering, it is possible to use flexible materials like TPUs. By modifying the manufacturing parameters, Sirris can modify their hardness to produce parts with different characteristics or to vary the properties within the same part.

In our factory with 4.0 technology, we aim to 3D print a watch. We use a femtosecond laser to create an optical effect, and we couldn’t be more impressed!

In its workshop in Diepenbeek Sirris is creating a new demonstrator, on which it will have to be possible to create smooth (3D) surfaces. Mechanical components with rough surfaces are preferably to be avoided. You will have to perform some time-consuming and expensive tricks to smoothen the surface. Our new demonstrator will enable us to produce components with smooth surfaces.